The use of laser light in dentistry has become much more popular in recent years, though most practices still do not use it. Lasers emit a focused beam of narrow, intense light for a wide variety of purposes. Lasers can be quiet substitutes for noisy drills, are able to vaporize tissue (rather than cutting it, often without anesthesia), so accurate that they can remove targeted spots without affecting the tissue next to it, reduce bleeding, encourage blood clotting, and have a sterilizing effect.

Laser Technology Benefits

Laser light’s specific uses in dentistry include making teeth less sensitive by sealing nerve endings and treating infected root canals to reducing the discomfort from TMJ Disorder, which makes it hard to open and close the mouth. And the compact nature of laser tools and their precision make them easier to use in the tight space of the mouth.

Although only 6% of dentists are estimated to currently use lasers in their work, the American Dental Association has said it is “cautiously optimistic” that they will eventually be widely adopted. Dr. Marine Martirosyan, however, is already a specialist in their use.

What is not yet fully appreciated by the general public or among most dentists is laser’s potential for cosmetic dentistry. They can remove scar tissue and benign growths and normalize dark spots on gums. Laser light can sculpt gum tissue so that an excess is removed, revealing more of the tooth, for those with “gummy smiles,” known as crown lengthening. On the other hand, if someone has too little tissue on the gum line, a laser can be used to painlessly remove it from an area where there is plenty, such as the palate, and use it where needed.

Porcelain Veneers

Veneers are very thin slices of dental porcelain that can be attached to the front of teeth that have the exact shade you want them to be, rather matching their neighbors or making the visible ones at the front whiter from a gleaming smile. This can eliminate the problem of teeth that are heavily stained beyond help from whitening procedures, can close gaps between teeth, and cover those that are too small, misshapen, or crooked. The teeth can be prepared to receive veneers and then have them bonded on using laser light.

Lasers are also used for hardening dental bonding which is an inexpensive way to place a tooth-colored composite resin over an area, such as to fill a cavity, to close spaces between teeth, or cover up discoloration.

Perhaps best of all, laser light speeds up all dental procedures, so there is less time in the chair, lowering the cost, and it enhances any necessary healing process afterwards.